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Author Topic: Bupe implant approved by the FDA  (Read 3547 times)

Offline Pullmyhair. (OP)

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Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« on: May 28, 2016, 03:24:12 PM »
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Re: Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2016, 03:33:21 PM »
Here's the text:

The Wall Street Journal
HEALTH
FDA Approves New Arm Implant to Treat Opioid Dependence
Braeburn Pharmaceuticals’ device could face opposition from advocates for total-sobriety approach

The FDA on Thursday approved a drug-emitting arm implant to treat addiction to heroin and other opioids.
The FDA on Thursday approved a drug-emitting arm implant to treat addiction to heroin and other opioids.PHOTO: FDA

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By Jeanne Whalen
Updated May 26, 2016 6:34 p.m. ET
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a drug-emitting arm implant to treat addiction to heroin and other opioids, providing a new tool against a condition that has proved extraordinarily difficult to manage.

Some addiction experts said the implant could offer a more reliable way to keep addicts on their medication. But like all drugs meant to treat drug addiction, the device could face opposition from those who embrace the total-sobriety approach to treatment long advocated by 12-step programs.

Despite a new push by the Obama administration and many public-health officials to promote medication for opioid addiction, some treatment centers still shun or discourage it.

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The match-stick-size implant, called Probuphine, emits buprenorphine, a drug that eases cravings for opioids and prevents withdrawal symptoms. Four implants are inserted into the upper arm at a time, providing six months’ worth of drug.

Behshad Sheldon, chief executive of the implant’s marketer, Braeburn Pharmaceuticals, said Probuphine would cost less than $6,000 for a six-month supply. She declined to be more specific. Titan Pharmaceuticals Inc. co-developed the device with Braeburn, and will receive royalties on sales.

Buprenorphine is already available in tablet form, or as films that dissolve in the mouth, but addicts sometimes run out of doses, or skip them and use illegal narcotics instead. Some also sell their buprenorphine to other addicts.

The implant makes this behavior impossible, and so has won support from some addiction experts.

“For someone with an opioid-use disorder, they have to decide on a daily basis if they’re going to take their buprenorphine,” says Marvin Seppala, chief medical officer of Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, a nonprofit treatment provider. “That decision every day to remain abstinent from opioids is difficult. The implant takes away that decision.”

Public-health officials say better treatment is desperately needed to fight the growing epidemic of opioid abuse. More than 47,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2014—a record that exceeded the number killed in car accidents, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The biggest drivers of those deaths were opioid painkillers and heroin.

The FDA approved Probuphine’s use in people who are already stable on a low or moderate dose of oral buprenorphine. The agency said Probuphine should be used alongside counseling and other “psychosocial support.” Health-care providers must complete a training program on inserting the implants before they will become certified to administer them, the FDA said.

A recent clinical study tested the implant in 175 people who had already been taking an oral form of buprenorphine for six months. Half continued to take oral doses and the other half received Probuphine; both groups received 10 urine tests over six months, to screen for illicit opioids.


Fatalities related to the synthetic opioid fentanyl—up to 50 times as powerful as heroin--are soaring in many parts of the country. Joseph Murphy's addiction to the drug tore his family apart. Now they're trying to put their lives back together. WSJ Video: Robert Libetti. Photo: Kieran Kesner for The Wall Street Journal

The study, financed by Braeburn Pharmaceuticals, found that rates of illicit opioid use were no worse in the Probuphine group than in the oral buprenorphine group, according to results summarized in FDA documents.

The most common side effects of Probuphine include pain, itching and redness at the implant site, as well as headache, depression and other issues, the FDA said.

The three main types of medication for opioid addiction all interact with the same parts of the brain that illicit opioids do. Methadone, like heroin, is a full opioid agonist that activates the brain’s opioid receptors, but it is a slower-acting drug that staves off withdrawal without producing the same euphoric rush. Buprenorphine is a partial agonist that blocks cravings and withdrawal symptoms but doesn’t typically cause euphoria in people accustomed to heroin, doctors say. Naltrexone is an opioid antagonist that blocks the opioid receptors so they can’t be activated to produce a high.

“Scientific evidence suggests that maintenance treatment with these medications in the context of behavioral treatment and recovery support are more effective in the treatment of opioid-use disorder than short-term detoxification programs aimed at abstinence,” Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, said in a statement Thursday.

Such evidence has convinced many treatment providers to start incorporating medication into rehab programs. In 2012, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation started recommending medication to opioid addicts after many decades of promoting abstinence treatment, said Dr. Seppala.

But persistent stigma about medication means not all patients have, or want, access to it. Many “are told by family members or judges or other health-care providers that taking a medication for part of their treatment is somehow substituting one addiction for another, that they aren’t totally in recovery or they aren’t ‘clean,’ ” says Yngvild Olsen, who chairs the public policy committee at the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

Mina Kalfas, a physician in northern Kentucky who uses medication to treat opioid addiction, says a number of rehab centers in the region still offer only abstinence-based treatment.

Write to Jeanne Whalen at jeanne.whalen@wsj.com

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Offline theSWPK

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Re: Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2016, 04:14:15 PM »
Now they just need to make an oxymorphone implant.
Now fixing in a parking lot near you!







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Re: Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2016, 05:10:36 PM »
Me and my doc have been discussing this for a while now, im actually willing to do it. Much easier to just forget about the whole pill process and just live life not sick and constantly chasing relief!
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Re: Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2016, 01:14:25 PM »
Yeah. Thats all great, except the fuckin implant is gonna cost fuckin 6000 bucks.  Or. "Less than 6k" sorry.  Fuckin retarded just like the hep c drug, nobodys gonna be able to afford to use it

Offline QueensVet

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Re: Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2016, 07:25:10 PM »
I served in the military so the VA hospital got me covered for a bit, thank God
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Re: Bupe implant approved by the FDA
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2016, 11:33:49 AM »
I had a girlfriend who had implunon which is just an implant like this but it's birth control. It was pretty neat, she said it didn't hurt to bad to be put in lasted 5 years and it was free with her insurance but would of cost $5000 without it. Hopefully the insurance that covers MMT and subs will cover the implant the same way and just be a co pay or doc visit to have it implanted. it felt like a flexible plastic toothpick under the skin in the inner arm right in the middle kinda under the bicep.

Any doctor can implant it, its implanted like a shot they stick you with a needle and shoot it throught it under the skin. Seems pretty cool but not for me, however oxy, opana, fent, might change my mind.

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