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Author Topic: AORD--Automated Overdose Rescue Device (by MORFY)  (Read 2838 times)

Offline Morfy (OP)

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AORD--Automated Overdose Rescue Device (by MORFY)
« on: December 09, 2015, 06:11:17 PM »

I sometime work with diabetic patients who have an insulin pump installed.


For those not familiar with this: instead of giving yourself an insulin shot a few times a day, you have a cellphone-sized device that can deliver insulin through a small cannula.  The patient just inputs how much insulin to inject.


As part of an innovation project to help prevent various ODs: there could be a small device, maybe worn like a wide bracelet, that uses Pulse Oximetry (aka PulseOx) to monitor a person's oxygen saturation levels.  It is non-invasive, and uses a laser light to check the color (oxygenation) of blood. 


Connected to the PulseOx, on the same bracelet, would be a few milligrams of naloxone, and or flumazenil (to counter-act benzos like xanax, valium, klonipin, etc...). 


The life-saving device would work like this:


1- Drug user attaches device to non-dominant wrist.
2- Maybe once every minute or so, it would check the user's oxygen saturation
3- If it notices the oxygen levels dropping below ~85% (from slow breathing, or not breathing), it would sound an alarm
4- If the alarm is NOT deactivated, or snoozed, in 1 minute, it will inject the first dose of reversal agent.
5- Continued lowering of oxygen levels would trigger another dose, and even a third dose.


Given the technology today, it could even have a basic cell phone integrated into it, to call an Amberlance.


The typical reversal agent would be naloxone.  But if the user typically combines opiates & benzos, then the device could also reverse the benzo effect with flumazenil.


Okay, ready for your comments, suggestions, criticisms etc....













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Offline corlene

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Re: AORD--Automated Overdose Rescue Device (by MORFY)
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2015, 08:43:21 PM »

I sometime work with diabetic patients who have an insulin pump installed.


For those not familiar with this: instead of giving yourself an insulin shot a few times a day, you have a cellphone-sized device that can deliver insulin through a small cannula.  The patient just inputs how much insulin to inject.


As part of an innovation project to help prevent various ODs: there could be a small device, maybe worn like a wide bracelet, that uses Pulse Oximetry (aka PulseOx) to monitor a person's oxygen saturation levels.  It is non-invasive, and uses a laser light to check the color (oxygenation) of blood. 


Connected to the PulseOx, on the same bracelet, would be a few milligrams of naloxone, and or flumazenil (to counter-act benzos like xanax, valium, klonipin, etc...). 


The life-saving device would work like this:


1- Drug user attaches device to non-dominant wrist.
2- Maybe once every minute or so, it would check the user's oxygen saturation
3- If it notices the oxygen levels dropping below ~85% (from slow breathing, or not breathing), it would sound an alarm
4- If the alarm is NOT deactivated, or snoozed, in 1 minute, it will inject the first dose of reversal agent.
5- Continued lowering of oxygen levels would trigger another dose, and even a third dose.


Given the technology today, it could even have a basic cell phone integrated into it, to call an Amberlance.


The typical reversal agent would be naloxone.  But if the user typically combines opiates & benzos, then the device could also reverse the benzo effect with flumazenil.


Okay, ready for your comments, suggestions, criticisms etc....

This thingamajig  can do exactly that morf, pretty damn cool it can connect to wifi and send alerts directly to whoever if something is off, bolus ya with drugs etc

Sorry for  picture quality, I was shaking like a leaf when I took it
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Offline Morfy (OP)

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Re: AORD--Automated Overdose Rescue Device (by MORFY)
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2015, 11:55:29 AM »
Fuck me running Corlene:


I had a multi-million dollar idea, only to figger-out its been done already.


Damn, damn, damn.


Well, best I hear it from a friend than have the Patent-Boys laugh me out of the office.


I think I'll get high now.
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All matter is simply cooled and condensed energy.

Offline corlene

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Re: AORD--Automated Overdose Rescue Device (by MORFY)
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2015, 01:59:59 PM »
Fuck me running Corlene:


I had a multi-million dollar idea, only to figger-out its been done already.


Damn, damn, damn.


Well, best I hear it from a friend than have the Patent-Boys laugh me out of the office.


I think I'll get high now.

Happy to hear I'm considered a friend. That thing is pretty neat, I wear it all the time. It can be configured in so many different ways. Extremely expensive tho, make it cheaper and they will come rest assured.
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Z

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Re: AORD--Automated Overdose Rescue Device (by MORFY)
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2015, 02:41:03 PM »
Good idea morfy.  Both the device and getting high now!
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