dopetalk does not endorse any advertised product nor does it accept any liability for it's use or misuse

This website has run out of funding so feel free to contribute if you can afford it (see footer)

Author Topic: Sublocade (buprenorphine) Subcutaneous Injection  (Read 285 times)

Offline Chip (OP)

  • Server Admin
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Join Date: Dec 2014
  • Location: Australia
  • Posts: 6572
  • Reputation Power: 0
  • Chip has hidden their reputation power
  • Gender: Male
  • Last Login:Today at 06:51:59 AM
  • Deeply Confused Learner
  • Profession: IT Engineer
Sublocade (buprenorphine) Subcutaneous Injection
« on: June 03, 2023, 08:58:13 AM »
source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326658#_noHeaderPrefixedContent

note: these are excerpts only. Take the source link above to see the full article. To see a personal account of how it feels to be on this drug, see here and look for member Cid Lysergic

Sublocade (buprenorphine) Subcutaneous Injection

FDA warning: Risk of serious harm or death with injection into a vein

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warningTrusted Source alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Sublocade must not be injected into a vein. This is because the drug becomes a solid mass after it’s injected. If Sublocade is injected into a vein, the mass that forms can move through your bloodstream and cause tissue damage. The mass can also block the blood supply to vital organs such as the lungs, resulting in serious harm or death.

What is Sublocade?

Sublocade (buprenorphine) is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s used in adults to treat moderate to severe opioid use disorder. An opioid is a powerful type of drug often prescribed to treat pain.

Sublocade helps prevent cravings and withdrawal symptoms that you may get if you stop taking opioid drugs.
These drugs include prescription pain relievers such as morphine, oxycodone, and fentanyl, and illegal drugs such as heroin.

For your doctor to prescribe Sublocade, you must first use a form of buprenorphine that you take under your tongue or inside your cheek. (You keep the buprenorphine in your mouth until it dissolves.) You’ll need to take a dose that manages your withdrawal symptoms for at least 7 days. Then your doctor may switch you to Sublocade.

Drug details

The buprenorphine in Sublocade is part of a class of drugs called partial opioid agonists. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.

Sublocade is given as an injection in your belly just under your skin (subcutaneous). A healthcare professional will give you the injection once a month in a clinic. You’ll also have counseling and other support as part of your treatment. These services are meant to help you to cope with emotional challenges or social situations that might lead you to use opioids again.

Effectiveness

Sublocade has been found to be effective at reducing opioid use.

A 24-week clinical study looked at people with opioid use disorder. About 30% of people who took Sublocade and had counseling didn’t use other opioids for at least 80% of the study. This was compared to 2% of the people who took a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Sublocade to treat opioid use disorder.

For your doctor to prescribe Sublocade, you must first use a form of buprenorphine that you take under your tongue or inside your cheek. (You keep the buprenorphine in your mouth until it dissolves.) You’ll need to take a dose that manages your withdrawal symptoms for at least 7 days. This is called induction treatment.

Then your doctor may switch you to Sublocade, which is used for maintenance treatment. This is when you have long-term treatment with buprenorphine to help keep your cravings and withdrawal symptoms well managed.

Sublocade is used as part of a treatment program that involves counseling and other support.

Suboxone is FDA-approved to treat opioid dependence. This is another name for opioid use disorder. Suboxone is used to reduce withdrawal symptoms when you first decrease or stop your use of opioids. This is the induction phase of treatment.

Suboxone is also used in the maintenance phase of treatment. This is when you keep taking Suboxone on a long-term basis. The drug helps keep your withdrawal symptoms and cravings in check as you go through your treatment program. The program will also involve counseling and other support. These are meant to help you to cope with emotional challenges or social situations that might lead you to use opioids again.

Drug forms and administration

Sublocade is given as an injection in your belly just under your skin (subcutaneous). A healthcare professional will give you the injection in a clinic.

Sublocade is available in two strengths: 100 mg/0.5 mL and 300 mg/1.5 mL.

You’ll receive Sublocade injections once a month.

Suboxone comes as an oral film that dissolves under your tongue (sublingual) or between your gums and cheek (buccal). Each film contains two drugs: buprenorphine and naloxone. The naloxone has little effect when you take the film by mouth. It’s included to discourage the misuse Suboxone.

If you were to try to inject Suboxone, the naloxone would block the effects of any opioids in your body. This would cause instant withdrawal symptoms if you were dependent on opioids.

Suboxone films come in four strengths:
  • 2 mg buprenorphine and 0.5 mg naloxone
  • 4 mg buprenorphine and 1 mg naloxone
  • 8 mg buprenorphine and 2 mg naloxone
  • 12 mg buprenorphine and 3 mg naloxone
You’ll take Suboxone once a day.

Side effects and risks

Sublocade and Suboxone both contain buprenorphine. Suboxone also contains naloxone, although your body will absorb very little naloxone when you take Suboxone by mouth. Both Sublocade and Suboxone can cause very similar side effects.

Serious side effects from Sublocade aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained in more detail below under “Side effect details,” can include the following:
  • severe allergic reaction
  • respiratory depression (slowed breathing) and coma
  • liver damage
  • adrenal gland problems
  • physical dependence that may lead to drug misuse*
See the source link for examples of these side effects.

* With dependence, your body needs a drug in order to function like usual. With misuse, a drug is taken in a way other than how it’s prescribed. Physical dependence can lead to withdrawal symptoms weeks to months after you stop Sublocade treatment. (See the “Sublocade and withdrawal” section below for more information.)

Symptoms of respiratory depression or CNS depression can include:
  • slow, shallow breathing
  • extreme sleepiness
  • confusion
  • slurred speech
  • problems with coordination
  • dizziness or fainting
  • turning blue
If you’re taking Sublocade and have symptoms of respiratory depression or CNS depression, call your doctor or Emergency Services right away.

Drinking alcohol or taking certain other drugs while you’re receiving Sublocade injections can increase your risk for respiratory and CNS depression, loss of consciousness, and death. Some of these drugs include:
  • benzodiazepines
  • sleeping pills
  • other tranquilizers or sedatives
  • opioids
  • muscle relaxants
  • certain antidepressants
  • antihistamines that cause drowsiness
Avoid drinking alcohol or taking these drugs while receiving Sublocade, unless your doctor says that it’s fine. You should also avoid these drugs for a few months after you stop treatment with Sublocade. This is because the drug can stay in your body for a few months after your last injection. (For more details about interactions that can cause respiratory depression or coma, see the “Sublocade interactions” section below.)

Effectiveness

The only condition that both Sublocade and Suboxone are used to treat is opioid use disorder. Sublocade is used only for maintenance treatment (to help keep your cravings and withdrawal symptoms managed long term). Suboxone can be used for induction treatment (to manage your withdrawal symptoms when you first stop taking other opioids) and maintenance treatment.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared for maintenance treatment yet.

The American Society of Addiction Medicine recommends buprenorphine as a treatment for opioid use disorder.

Costs

Sublocade and Suboxone are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of Sublocade. But there are generic forms of Suboxone. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

The actual price you’ll pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan and your location.

Sublocade and withdrawal

Your body can become physically dependent on Sublocade, and it’s possible to have mild withdrawal symptoms after stopping treatment. (With dependence, your body needs a drug in order to function like usual.)

However, you may not have withdrawal symptoms until a few weeks or months after your last injection. Each injection of Sublocade provides a steady level of the drug for a month. After your last injection, the level of the drug in your body will start to slowly lower.

At some point, you and your doctor may agree that it’s time to stop treatment with Sublocade. When this happens, you should be monitored for withdrawal symptoms for a few weeks to months after your last injection. These symptoms may include:
  • shaking
  • goose bumps
  • muscle aches
  • sweating
  • feeling hot and/or cold
  • runny nose
  • watery eyes
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
It’s important to talk with your doctor about what to do if you have withdrawal symptoms. Sometimes other medications can help ease such symptoms.

Sublocade dosage

The following information describes Sublocade dosages that are commonly used or recommended. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to suit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Sublocade is given as an injection in your belly just under your skin (subcutaneous). A healthcare professional will give you the injection in a clinic.

Sublocade is available in two strengths: 100 mg/0.5 mL and 300 mg/1.5 mL.

You’ll receive Sublocade injections once each month.

Dosage for opioid use disorder

The usual dosage of Sublocade is a 300-mg injection once a month for 2 months. This will be followed by a 100-mg injection once per month for as long as your doctor recommends.

In some cases, the 100-mg dose may not be effective. So your doctor may increase your dosage to 300 mg once each month.

There should be at least 26 days between your doses.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss an appointment to have an injection of Sublocade, call your doctor right away to reschedule. You should have the injection as soon as possible. If you have the injection within 2 weeks of missing your dose, there shouldn’t be any problems. However, if you have the injection later than this, you could start to have symptoms of withdrawal.

To help you remember your appointments, put them in a calendar. You can also set a reminder on your phone.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

This depends on your personal circumstances. Treatment for opioid use disorder is usually long term. If you and your doctor determine that Sublocade is safe and effective for you, you can keep using it long term as part of your treatment program. You and your doctor will decide together when you might be ready to end your treatment with Sublocade.

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Sublocade to treat opioid use disorder.

For your doctor to prescribe Sublocade, you must first use a form of buprenorphine that you take under your tongue or inside your cheek. (You keep the buprenorphine in your mouth until it dissolves.) You’ll need to take a dose that manages your withdrawal symptoms for at least 7 days. Then your doctor may switch you to Sublocade.

Sublocade is used as part of a treatment program that involves counseling and other support. This is to help you to cope with emotional challenges or social situations that might lead you to use opioids again.

Common questions about Sublocade

Does Sublocade have naloxone in it?

No, Sublocade injections contain only the drug buprenorphine.

Naloxone is a drug that blocks the effects of opioids. It’s used to treat opioid overdose. Naloxone is included in some buprenorphine medications that you take by mouth, such as Suboxone, Bunavail, and Zubsolv. When you take these drugs by mouth, your body absorbs very little of the naloxone. The naloxone is included in these medications only to help prevent people from misusing them. (With misuse, a medication is taken in a way other than how it’s prescribed.)

Sublocade doesn’t contain naloxone because the injections are given only by your healthcare professional. So there’s very little chance that anyone else could obtain the drug and misuse it.

Where will I be given Sublocade treatments?

The only way to receive Sublocade injections is from a healthcare professional at certain clinics. The clinic must be certified by the Sublocade Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program. This drug safety program restricts access to Sublocade to help prevent the drug from being misused. (With misuse, a medication is taken in a way other than how it’s prescribed.)

See the “FDA warning: Risk of serious harm or death with injection into a vein” section at the top of this article to learn more.

If you have questions about where to receive your Sublocade injections, ask your doctor.

If I’m taking Sublocade, can I use pain relievers during an emergency or if I’m having surgery?

While you’re receiving Sublocade, it’s fine to take non-opioid medications to relieve pain. These include acetaminophen and anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen.

However, you should avoid taking opioids to relieve pain whenever possible. Opioids can increase your risk for respiratory depression (slowed breathing), loss of consciousness, and death. Opioids can also be less effective than usual at relieving pain if you’re taking Sublocade.

In an emergency or if you’re having surgery, tell the medical staff that you’re taking Sublocade. (You can also have your family give the staff this information.) Opioid pain relievers should be used only under the supervision of medical staff who know that you’re taking treatment for opioid dependence. They’ll need to monitor your breathing while the opioid is in your body.

This also applies for a few months after you stop receiving Sublocade. You’ll still have Sublocade in your body for a few months after your last injection.

Effectiveness

Researchers have looked into how effective Sublocade is in helping treat opioid use disorder.

Results from a 12-week study

Sublocade was found to reduce the rewarding effects of other opioids in a 12-week study. Researchers looked at 39 people with opioid use disorder. First, these people were given two injections: one of an opioid called hydromorphone and one placebo (treatment with no active drug). The people were asked to rate how much they liked the effects of each injection on a visual-analog scale. With this scale, personal feelings are described next to a number.

Then the people were given buprenorphine taken under the tongue (Suboxone films). After this, they were given an injection of Sublocade, followed by another Sublocade injection 4 weeks later.

While the Sublocade was in the people’s systems, they were given an injection of hydromorphone once per week. They were also given a placebo injection once each week. The people were asked to rate how much they liked the effects of each injection on the same scale as before.

Before Sublocade was given, the hydromorphone injection produced much more rewarding effects than the placebo injection. While the people had Sublocade in their body, the rewarding effects of hydromorphone weren’t significantly different from those of the placebo.

Results from a 24-week study

In a 24-week clinical study, Sublocade was found to be effective at reducing opioid use. Researchers looked at 489 people with opioid use disorder. For 7 to 14 days, these people were first treated with a form of buprenorphine that you place under your tongue. Then they were split into three groups:
  • Group 1 was given 300 mg of Sublocade once each month for 6 months.
  • Group 2 was given 300 mg of Sublocade once each month for 2 months. This was followed by 100 mg of Sublocade once each month for 4 months.
  • Group 3 was given a placebo (treatment with no active drug) once each month for 6 months.
In addition to their monthly injections, people in all three groups had counseling at least once per week. Each week, researchers checked their urine for evidence of opioid use.

People in groups 1 and 2 who were given Suboxone and counseling had more weeks during which they didn’t use other opioids. This was compared to people in group 3, who received a placebo and counseling. About 30% of people in groups 1 and 2 (the Suboxone groups) didn’t use other opioids for at least 80% of the 24-week study. This was compared to 2% of the people in group 3 (the placebo group).

Sublocade use with other treatments

It’s important that Sublocade is used as part of a complete treatment program for opioid use disorder. Along with your Sublocade injections, you’ll be given counseling and various forms of emotional or behavioral therapy, or support with social issues. This aims to help you avoid or cope with situations that might lead you to use opioids again.

The type of therapy or support offered depends on your personal circumstances. It might include:
  • individual or group counseling sessions
  • cognitive behavioral therapy, which helps you adjust your negative thoughts to better deal with problems
  • family therapy
  • access to support groups
  • help with social issues such as employment or housing
If you’re taking Sublocade and have questions about counseling or other forms of support, talk with your doctor.

Sublocade with Narcan

If you’re at risk of opioid overdose during Sublocade treatment, your doctor may recommend that you have naloxone (Narcan) available. This drug is used to help reverse an opioid overdose while you’re waiting for medical help to arrive. To learn more about Narcan and how to take it, see this article.

Sublocade and alcohol

You should avoid drinking alcohol while you’re receiving Sublocade. Drinking alcohol can increase your risk for serious side effects such as:
  • higher tolerance to alcohol
  • slowed breathing
  • severe drowsiness
  • slow reaction time
  • loss of consciousness
  • coma
  • death, in rare cases
If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about the possible risks and whether Sublocade is right for you.

Sublocade and other medications

Below are lists of medications that can interact with Sublocade. These lists don’t contain all drugs that may interact with Sublocade.

Before taking Sublocade, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Sublocade and benzodiazepines

Taking benzodiazepines with Sublocade can increase your risk for serious side effects. (Benzodiazepines are drugs for anxiety or insomnia.) These side effects include respiratory depression (slowed breathing), severe sleepiness, loss of consciousness, coma, and death.

Examples of benzodiazepines that can increase the risk of serious side effects if taken with Sublocade include:
  • alprazolam (Xanax)
  • clonazepam (Klonopin)
  • diazepam (Valium)
  • lorazepam (Ativan)
Avoid taking benzodiazepines while you receive Sublocade and for a few months after you stop Sublocade treatment. You should use a benzodiazepine drug only if your doctor has prescribed it and knows that you’re receiving Sublocade.

Sublocade and sleeping pills

Taking sleeping pills with Sublocade can increase your risk for serious side effects. These include respiratory depression (slowed breathing), severe sleepiness, loss of consciousness, coma, and death.

Examples of sleeping pills that can increase the risk of serious side effects if taken with Sublocade include:
  • eszopiclone (Lunesta)
  • zaleplon (Sonata)
  • zolpidem (Ambien and Ambien CR)
Avoid taking sleeping pills while you receive Sublocade and for a few months after you stop Sublocade treatment. You should use sleeping pills only if your doctor has prescribed them and knows that you’re receiving Sublocade.

Sublocade and other opioids

Taking other opioids with Sublocade can increase your risk for serious side effects. These include respiratory depression (slowed breathing), severe sleepiness, loss of consciousness, coma, and death. Sublocade may also make opioid pain relievers less effective at relieving pain.

Examples of other opioids that can increase the risk of serious side effects if taken with Sublocade include:
  • codeine
  • dihydrocodeine
  • fentanyl (Fentora and others)
  • heroin
  • hydrocodone (Vicodin)
  • methadone
  • morphine
  • oxycodone (Percocet)
  • tramadol (Ultram, Conzip)
  • street drugs such as Heroin, Fentanyl and/or Tranq
Avoid taking opioids while you receive Sublocade and for a few months after you stop Sublocade treatment. You should use an opioid pain reliever only if your doctor has prescribed it and knows that you’re receiving Sublocade.

How Sublocade is given

A healthcare professional will give you Sublocade as an injection in your belly just under your skin (subcutaneous).*

For each injection, they’ll choose a different spot on your belly. You’ll go to a clinic to receive the injections.

After you have an injection of Sublocade, you may develop a lump in the injection area. This is because Sublocade reacts with your body’s fluids to form a solid mass. Over the next month, the mass will get smaller as the drug is absorbed into your bloodstream. Keep in mind these helpful tips
  • Don’t rub or massage the lump or injection site.
  • Don’t try to remove the lump.
  • Avoid wearing clothing with tight waistbands or belts that may rub the injection area.
If you have any concerns about the lump after your Sublocade injection, talk with your doctor.

When to take

Your healthcare professional will give you an injection of Sublocade once each month. The injections should be given at lease 26 days apart.

Make sure you keep your appointments to have your injections of Sublocade. To help you remember, write down your schedule on a calendar or set a reminder in your phone.

How Sublocade works

Sublocade is prescribed to treat moderate to severe opioid use disorder in adults.

An opioid is a powerful type of drug often used to treat pain. Opioids include prescription pain relievers such as oxycodone, fentanyl, hydromorphone, and tramadol, and illegal drugs such as heroin.

Opioids work by acting on special areas in your brain called mu opioid receptors. This has a strong pain-relieving effect, but it also produces the “high” (euphoric) feeling that opioids can cause. These feelings can make you crave opioids.

Repeated use of opioids can also make your body dependent on these drugs. So if you stop taking opioids, you may have symptoms of withdrawal, such as muscle aches, sweating, or diarrhea.

What Sublocade does

Sublocade contains an opioid called buprenorphine, which is widely used in treatment programs for opioid use disorder. The aim of treatment is to replace other opioids with buprenorphine, and then wean off buprenorphine over time.

Buprenorphine is a type of drug called a partial opioid agonist. It acts on your mu opioid receptors, but it doesn’t stimulate them as much as full opioid agonists, such as heroin or morphine.

This means that buprenorphine helps you stop craving opioids, but it doesn’t produce the same high feeling you may get from other opioids. Buprenorphine also helps prevent withdrawal symptoms that you may have after you stop taking other opioids.

Sublocade is an extended-release or long-acting form of buprenorphine, which means that it works over a long time. After Sublocade is injected, it reacts with your body’s fluids to form a solid mass. This mass will slowly break down over the next month, steadily releasing the drug into your bloodstream.

Over time, you’ll have a steady level of buprenorphine in the mu receptors in your brain. This can stop other opioids from acting on the receptors. So if you take other opioids during your treatment, they may not give you a “high” feeling.

Two phases of treatment

Opioid use disorder is treated in two phases: induction and maintenance. In the induction phase, you’ll take a form of buprenorphine under your tongue or inside your cheek. This will help reduce withdrawal symptoms as you take less or stop using other opioids.

Once your cravings and withdrawal symptoms are managed, you can move to the maintenance phase of treatment. First, you’ll stop taking the form of buprenorphine by mouth. Then you’ll start using Sublocade to help keep your withdrawal symptoms under long-term control. Sublocade may also help curb your cravings for other opioids and help prevent you from using them during your treatment.

How long does it take to work?

Sublocade starts to work right away. So your cravings and withdrawal symptoms should start to be managed after your first Sublocade injection.

Sublocade and pregnancy

See the source link for more on this.

Buprenorphine and birth control

See the source link for more on this.

Sublocade and breastfeeding

See the source link for more on this.

Sublocade precautions

See the source link for more on this.

Professional information for Sublocade

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Sublocade is approved to treat moderate to severe opioid use disorder in adults. Treatment must not be started until patients have been taking transmucosal buprenorphine, with dose adjustment to manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings, for at least 7 days.

Sublocade must be used in conjunction with counseling and psychosocial support as part of a structured program.

Mechanism of action

Buprenorphine acts as a partial opioid agonist at the mu receptor. It acts as an opioid antagonist at the kappa receptor.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Sublocade injection contains buprenorphine dissolved in the Atrigel delivery system. This solidifies on contact with body fluids, forming a solid mass that gradually dissolves over a month, delivering buprenorphine at a controlled, constant rate.

The time to reach maximum blood concentration of buprenorphine is a median of 24 hours after injection of Sublocade. Steady-state is reached after 4 to 6 months of monthly injections.

Approximately 96% of buprenorphine is bound to plasma proteins.

Buprenorphine is primarily metabolized by CYP3A4. Its major metabolite is norbuprenorphine, which is further transformed to its glucuronidated form. The majority of metabolites are excreted in the feces and a small amount in the urine. The elimination half-life is 43 to 60 days.

Buprenorphine may still be detected in plasma for 12 months or longer after treatment with Sublocade is stopped.

Age, sex and race do not significantly affect the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine. Clearance is significantly reduced in moderate and severe hepatic impairment. The effect of renal impairment was not studied.

Contraindications

Sublocade is contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to buprenorphine or the Atrigel delivery system, which is made up of a 50:50 poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) biodegradable polymer with a N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), a biocompatible solvent.

Misuse and dependence

Buprenorphine is a Schedule III controlled drug. It has potential for misuse and can cause physical and psychological dependence. Patients who are prescribed buprenorphine should be monitored for diversion, misuse, and addictive behaviors.

Misuse of Sublocade by intravenous injection can cause thromboembolic events resulting in serious harm or death.

The potential for diversion and misuse is minimized by the Sublocade Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy Program (REMS). Sublocade can only be supplied to healthcare professionals by pharmacies certified by the REMS program. Sublocade can only be administered by a healthcare professional at a healthcare setting certified by the REMS program.

Storage

Sublocade injection should be stored in a refrigerator at 35.6° to 46.4°F (2° to 8°C) before use. It can also be stored in the original packaging at room temperature of 59° to 86°F (15° to 30°C) for up to seven days.

It should be removed from refrigeration 15 minutes before administering the injection to allow it time to warm up.

Do not administer Sublocade if it has been kept at a room temperature for more than seven days.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2023, 09:53:01 AM by Chip »
friendly
0
funny
0
informative
0
agree
0
disagree
0
like
0
dislike
0
No reactions
No reactions
No reactions
No reactions
No reactions
No reactions
No reactions
Our Discord Server invitation link is https://discord.gg/jB2qmRrxyD

Tags: sublocade 
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
854 Views
Last post August 21, 2015, 10:44:49 AM
by Chip
4 Replies
5742 Views
Last post August 26, 2015, 05:25:40 PM
by Taytoechip
2 Replies
4874 Views
Last post July 30, 2016, 08:25:50 PM
by LoneRanger7
0 Replies
2149 Views
Last post September 28, 2019, 04:37:05 AM
by Chip
0 Replies
3014 Views
Last post March 12, 2020, 06:23:22 PM
by Chip
0 Replies
3214 Views
Last post March 12, 2020, 06:57:01 PM
by Chip
0 Replies
3411 Views
Last post March 12, 2020, 08:17:18 PM
by Chip
0 Replies
1336 Views
Last post February 24, 2021, 04:25:30 PM
by limerence
0 Replies
1425 Views
Last post April 20, 2021, 11:21:56 PM
by Chip
0 Replies
179 Views
Last post May 28, 2023, 05:29:35 AM
by Chip


dopetalk does not endorse any advertised product nor does it accept any liability for it's use or misuse





TERMS AND CONDITIONS

In no event will d&u or any person involved in creating, producing, or distributing site information be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, punitive, special or consequential damages arising out of the use of or inability to use d&u. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless d&u, its domain founders, sponsors, maintainers, server administrators, volunteers and contributors from and against all liability, claims, damages, costs and expenses, including legal fees, that arise directly or indirectly from the use of any part of the d&u site.


TO USE THIS WEBSITE YOU MUST AGREE TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS ABOVE


Founded December 2014
SimplePortal 2.3.6 © 2008-2014, SimplePortal