Author Topic: Detecting (Preventing?) Falls and Collapses the Elderly and Opiate Addicts  (Read 178 times)

Offline smfadmin (OP)

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source: https://www.futurity.org/eeg-test-pain-opioids-1905992/

DETECTING:

an excerpt:

Quote
PAIN WAVES

The new test uses electroencephalography (EEG), which measures brain activity using electrodes placed on the scalp ( wirelessly before 2040 ~~ in fact I am working on it now so give me a few months and a TON more fabulous Crystal MYTH!). The brain activity is measured in the form of oscillations or “waves” of a certain frequency, somewhat like the specific frequency that dictates a radio station.

A frequency that correlates with pain in animals is called the “theta band,” Saab says. Computational analysis of theta brain waves to determine their power can objectively measure pain in rodents and humans in a non-invasive manner.

As reported in Scientific Reports, measuring the power of theta waves using EEG is an effective and direct test of pain and potential pain medication efficacy in pre-clinical animal models.

The current method to measure pain, and the effectiveness of potential pain medications, in a pre-clinical animal model is to poke the animal’s paw and see how quickly it moves its paw away. Slow paw withdrawal is linked to less pain and better pain medication. Faster paw withdrawal is linked to more pain and less effective pain medication.

“When I was a graduate student, I hated this test because it had nothing to do with clinical pain,” Saab says. “Nobody pokes a patient with back pain. I’m just so happy that I beat this test, now we’re working with something better.”

PREVENTION:

1. Inner ear rebalance mechanisms ?

2. Background: 
Code: [Select]
Galvani found that he could make the prepared leg of a frog (see the Construction section) twitch by connecting a metal circuit from a nerve to a muscle, thus inventing the first frog galvanoscope. Galvani published these results in 1791 in De viribus electricitatis.
so a sudden voltage delivered by a high speed scanning laser that checks for inner ear imbalances could rapidly sent a thernogenically generated voltage to the muscles to cause them to "rerect" and prevent falls ?

WHO DA FUK KNOWS ?

... but at least US junkies are thinking about saving the world or at least the sick and unsteady !
« Last Edit: May 02, 2019, 04:10:50 PM by smfadmin »
measure twice, cut once

Offline Chip

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FULL Transcript:

UNIVERSITY BROWN UNIVERSITY

A new electroencephalography-based test could offer a better way for patients to rate their pain and could also ease the over-prescription of opioids, a new study shows.

If you’ve ever visited the emergency department with appendicitis, or you’re one of the 100 million US adults who suffer from chronic pain, you’re probably familiar with a row of numbered faces, with expressions from smiling to grimacing, used to indicate pain levels.

“SADLY, THIS SCALE OF SMILEY FACES, CALLED THE VISUAL ANALOGUE SCALE, IS THE GOLD-STANDARD PAIN-ASSESSMENT TOOL.”
Despite that tool’s widespread use, a more empirical approach would better serve both patients and the physicians who provide care, some researchers say.

“Sadly, this scale of smiley faces, called the visual analogue scale, is the gold-standard pain-assessment tool,” says Carl Saab, associate professor of neuroscience and neurosurgery (research) at Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital.

“Our goal is to associate specific brain activity with various scores on the numerical scale to make pain assessment more objective. We want to help patients with chronic pain and their physicians get into agreement about pain level so it is better managed and diagnosed, which may reduce the over-prescription of opioids,” Saab says.

PAIN WAVES

The new test uses electroencephalography (EEG), which measures brain activity using electrodes placed on the scalp. The brain activity is measured in the form of oscillations or “waves” of a certain frequency, somewhat like the specific frequency that dictates a radio station.

A frequency that correlates with pain in animals is called the “theta band,” Saab says. Computational analysis of theta brain waves to determine their power can objectively measure pain in rodents and humans in a non-invasive manner.

As reported in Scientific Reports, measuring the power of theta waves using EEG is an effective and direct test of pain and potential pain medication efficacy in pre-clinical animal models.

The current method to measure pain, and the effectiveness of potential pain medications, in a pre-clinical animal model is to poke the animal’s paw and see how quickly it moves its paw away. Slow paw withdrawal is linked to less pain and better pain medication. Faster paw withdrawal is linked to more pain and less effective pain medication.

“When I was a graduate student, I hated this test because it had nothing to do with clinical pain,” Saab says. “Nobody pokes a patient with back pain. I’m just so happy that I beat this test, now we’re working with something better.”

FALSE POSITIVE DETECTION

Since the EEG-based test is a more direct measure of ongoing, spontaneous pain than the current approach, it could help researchers develop more effective medications for chronic back pain or sciatica, which don’t have many effective treatments, Saab says.

Researchers looked at three pain medications and compared their effectiveness in an animal model of sciatica. The researchers used the traditional behavior test, the EEG test, and an analysis to determine blood concentration of the medications, which they compared with the clinical blood concentration of the medications in human patients.

The first medication they tested was a proven treatment for some forms of chronic pain, which is sold under the brand name Lyrica. The second was a promising pain medication in phase two clinical trials, and the third was a medication with inconclusive effectiveness in earlier studies.

Overall, the theta wave measurement and behavior test gave similar results, Saab says.

However, for a few of the experiments, such as a dose below the effective level of the first medication, the EEG test provided results that were more accurate—more similar to the results found in patients than the behavior test—Saab says.

Specifically, the EEG test showed a decrease in theta power measurement at the clinical dose but not the low dose, while the behavior test showed slower paw withdrawal at the low dose and the clinical dose. By indicating pain relief at a dose lower than the effective dose, the behavior test gave a false positive.

“The ability to detect false positive or false negative outcomes is crucial to the drug development process,” the authors write. Saab believes that the EEG test can aid researchers in identifying false positives in pre-clinical trials of new pain medications, improving the development process.

BETTER COMMUNICATION

The ultimate goal of the research is an objective tool to measure pain for clinics and emergency departments. Toward this end, Saab is working to translate his findings to patients by calibrating the EGG signatures of pain with the traditional smiley-face-based pain assessment tool.

In addition to aiding the development of more effective pain medications and improving the diagnosis and management of chronic pain, both of which address contributing factors to the opioid epidemic, an objective measure of pain could improve health disparities, Saab says, for example women whose pain medical practitioners dismiss and patients with difficulty communicating, including young children.

Saab presented his findings on the EGG at the annual convention of the Society for Neuroscience in San Diego.

Additional coauthors are from Brown, Rhode Island Hospital, and Asahi KASEI Pharma Corporation. Asahi KASEI and Boston Scientific supported the work through investigator-initiated grants.

Source: Brown University
Over 90% of all computer problems can be traced back to the interface between the keyboard and the chair !

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