Author Topic: Difference between 2000ng/ml and a 300ng test  (Read 2442 times)

Offline Dog Food (OP)

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Difference between 2000ng/ml and a 300ng test
« on: November 03, 2016, 12:30:39 PM »
So i havent found too much regarding detection times for more stringent tests.  How much of a difference is there between the two.  Ive passed a home opiate 2000ng dip test yesterday on day 3 with a solid line, but not sure if another two days will have been enough if it is a lower amount on day 5 or if theres a longer time between the two tests. Anyone have experience???

Offline Fleas Bass

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Re: Difference between 2000ng/ml and a 300ng test
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2016, 07:38:03 PM »
Now In could be wrong, but I believe the 2000ng/ml test is less
refined. It uses a larger window of detection or rather needs more drug concentration in your blood for said drug to pop positive vs negative.

The 300ng test will need less drug concentration to show as positive.

Again this is just an educated guess based on the numbers. Best of luck!
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Re: Difference between 2000ng/ml and a 300ng test
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2016, 08:36:49 PM »
Right, i just was curious if anyones had any experiences in how much longer itl take to pass the lower one once youre already passing the 2000.  Like i dont wanna end up with just over the limit

Offline wanderingmind

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Re: Difference between 2000ng/ml and a 300ng test
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2016, 04:17:42 AM »
I consider myself to have a bit of knowledge regarding biochemistry as that was my major in college.

Someone replied as to the difference between the two cut-offs.  2,000 nanograms per mL is equivalent to 2 micrograms.  300 nanograms per mL is equivalent to 0.3 micrograms per mL.  So, in the first test, it needs AT LEAST 2 micrograms in a mL to "trigger" the immunoassay to react thus forming a line.  In the other test, which IIRC, is usually only done in gas chromotography/mass spectrometry.  GC/MS is basically a machine where you put a sample in and then a gas gets pushed rapidly through the sample which kind of pulls the sample apart into individual molecules of the chemical.  This is then analyzed by a computer which is able to spit out a result telling the lab how many nanograms per mL of a chemical is present.  (This is a very quick description and pales in comparison the complexity of GC/MS).  In conclusion, 2 micrograms is a larger value than 0.3 micrograms.  In other words, you might pass a 2,000 nanograms/mL test three days after using, but you could test positive for 300 nanograms/mL.  Hope that makes sense.

As to the second part of your question...that is a bit harder.  Even if you were able to graph the half-life elimination in yourself, you would find that there would be peaks and valleys.  It simply can't be a perfect curve.  The body is constantly manufacturing and eliminating enzymes.  So, from day to day, you have minor differences in enzyme levels.  Being that enzymes are responsible for breaking down nearly everything, including opioids, you can see how these daily differences would affect the half-life elimination of a particular drug.  Even if you had access to a GC/MS, took samples every hour and came up with an equation that says, "I should be able to pass the lower cut-off test on day at hour 73, you may still test positive.  Or, you may test negative several hours before hour 73.  All in all, it is really hard to come up with a safe time frame.  You could always make a half-life graph and that will help you visualize half-life elimination.  But remember, half-life is different in everybody.  Someone might eliminate drug X in 3.7 hours while another person might eliminate that same drug in 2 hours.

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